Friday, October 13, 2006

Peanut butter

Actually, this is Ruth, not Annette, posting. Assunta, the woman who cleans our house and sometimes cooks for us, has made us second bucket of peanut butter, and I thought you all needed to see. In a household with 3 teenagers who are always hungry, and 2 kids under the age of 4 (who like to eat the same things all the time), peanut butter is an essential substance. Before we hired Assunta, we got our peanut butter from a street vendor, in a plastic bag. I for one thought it was nasty. Assunta agrees with me. She said there's too much sand in it. So she made us this. It's very smooth and good, but I don't think there's any salt in it. If you leave a knife in, it slowly sinks. We haven't yet had one swallowed completely, but I'm pretty sure it'll happen.

As you can see, we really like the stuff.

4 comments:

CuracaoChick said...

I wish we had that much penut butter. That would be good.

David said...

Yeah. You have to add a bit of salt, especially because there's so little salt in most of the bread in Sudan. And if you want it to taste like American P-butter (e.g. Skippy), you have to add some sugar as well. I must say that the idea of peanut butter by the "vat" is an intensely appealing one for me. The Arabic word for peanut (at least the one I've heard them use in Khartoum, فول سوداني or "fuul sudani") literally means Sudanese bean. What could be more American than a Sudanese bean-butter sandwich?

hoyan said...

Hello Pimentel family! You write a great blog. That bread Ed is eating is so familiar: we used to have that type of bread all the time in Yemen (basically baguettes). They are so good when fresh, and so hard when stale! Never had peanut butter in a vat, though...

Annette said...

Hoyan, this morning we tried to have some of that bread as bread and milk for breakfast and it was so hard nobody could break it into pieces to put in their bowl!